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20121108
20121116
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
the argument on foreign policy in part because a lot of people are sick of the two wars that george w. bush got us into. that's just a fact. gorgeous george w. bush's type of republic party mitt romney as todd akin richard mourdock in another. >> very good with latinos, kevin mccarthy. we have some bright new leaders and we need to have more of those. >> george w. bush's policies spending and two wars ended up also delivering barack obama into the white house. but let's start with you, chip. your take where we are. what do you think of my point that romney ran a defensive campaign but he also did have to deal with the bush baggage, credibility on spending, and a foreign policy that was frankly the by product of the hopeful but ultimately rather confused and unsuccessful policy in the middle east? >> yeah. i think you are spot on. first, let me say i aspire to be one of those old white guys. >> laura: and rich. >> definitely be a rich old white guy no question. that's what i aspire to be. no question a heavy load for romney. to thine ownself be true. we know who we are as a party. center right p
still, president obama, i think, has been cautious with foreign policy, we have a divided government, and we have to take care of the fiscal cliff that's looming, and that's the first order of business. not making any predigses, but i think it's just useful to see where we are, and i think the election results do have implications for some of the concerns that we outlined in the report. i'll turn it over to peter, manuel, and margaret for their summary remarks. >> thank you. great introduction. let me start, and, in fact, i want to focus on the visit at the end of the month which will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election has had any keep of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about latin america or the way that latin america thinks about the u.s.. it's an important meeting for both presidents k become somewhat routine now for the president-elect of mexico to come toñ&r the united states bee the inauguration. calderÓn did, and i don't remember back further, but -- >> [inaudible] >> i was too young then. [laughter] in any event, the visit,
.0 with respect to our foreign policy on israel and iran? because you had been sounding alarm bells about how the sanctions weren't going to do it, iran is moving towards a nuclear bomb, and if we don't step up the sanctions severely or do something else, you know, they're going to wind up with a nuke, or israel's going to act militarily? where do you see us now? >> well, i don't think anything has changed just because of our election on tuesday. i think the most likely outcome in the middle east remains that iran will get nuclear weapons unless israel or the united states acts militarily. i see zero chance the obama administration will do that, so people are necessarily concentrating on israel. i think president obama will put merciless pressure on israel not to use military force. i think he will try to affect the outcome of the israeli election in january and do what he can to make sure netanyahu's not reelected. that could include a very public discussion with iran bilaterally, it could include behind-the-scenes pressure. but i think the stakes are very high here. megyn: i want to talk to
control. president obama, i think, has been shown to be pretty cautious when it comes to foreign policy. we still have a divided government and we also have to take care of this fiscal cliff that is looming, and that is the first order of business. not making any predictions, but i think it is just useful to see where we are and i do think the election results to have implications for some of the concerns that we outlined in this report. i will turn it over to peter and then market and manuel. >> thank you. a good introduction. let me start -- i want to focus on the opinion yet to visit at the end of this month, which will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election really has had any kind of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about latin america or the way that latin america is thinking about the u.s.. this is an important meeting for both presidents. it has become somewhat routine now with the president elect of mexico to come to the u.s. before the inauguration. calderÓn did, foxx did. i do not remember back farther than that, but anyhow -- i wa
: let's go to foreign policy because "the washington times" as this headline -- scott wilson, do you expect that he does that? troops on the ground? guest: i do not expect troops on the grand. as far as the president would go in syria, the next step is some kind of a no-fly zone. you will start seeing the model that he put in place and advocated for in libya. he is someone who moves incrementally. the next real step is the first plunge into military would be directly harming the rebels. they do not know the rebels that well. they do not want to start sending heavy weapons to groups that are clearly influenced by islamists. so that has been one caution. then the next step would likely be considering some sort of international no-fly zone like what took place in libya. host: iran's nuclear program? do we know what he might do? guest: i think in terms of old assertions of next steps, some of that may wait for the next secretary of state. this is something that the next secretary of state would be shepherding through and then stick it in somebody else's lap. it is probably strategically
american. and all three are very conservative on foreign policy. some domestic policies, they will find ortiz and rubio will slightly lead some of the charge in the republican ranks in the senate to adopt some kind of comprehensive immigration reform. i think the time has come for the country to do comprehensive reform. as i have said many times over the last year or two, immigration reform is going to change the politics of the nation just by the nature of who eventually becomes or is able to regularize their status and be able to vote. it was ronald reagan in 1986 who signed into law the last comprehensive immigration reform, which allowed about 3 million people to regularize their status -- most of them hispanic. within five years, those people were able to vote. effecting much of what happened in the clinton era in terms of what was happening in democratic resurgence. i think this time around, we're talking 11 million to 12 million people. immigration reform is accomplished next year, did you can assume within five, six, seven years many of those people will then be able to enter th
an article calling the other fiscal cliff as foreign policy. the shake up on the foreign relations committees -- three of the chair and a ranking member being gone but if senator kerry would move positions it would be a complete clean slate on how often set aside and wondering how it affects the president's ability to build up the top line foreign policy issues, like syria and iran, but also others like foreign aid which has a nice rubber duckie on the catalog today. it helps pay our salaries. >> i think bob corker will be interesting as ranking member on foreign relations. he skipped the republican convention this summer to go to the middle east. and he has been doing a lot of traveling. he is super smart about these kinds of things. i think he will try to mold himself a little bit -- not completely, like dick lugar, honestly. he will be against the hawks i think on a number of occasions. we did a story recently about him and we had john mccain talk about how much -- how much he respected and although they did not always see eye to eye. but i think the foreign relations panel in both chamber
what you are saying. the demos don't care about the foreign policy. >> bob: part of it. the demo is the demo. we are talking about -- >> greg: i agree, i agree, bob. conservatives have to find a way to reach out to the new demographics and explain why freedom is better than free stuff. they have to do it and do it soon. they are getting young people like eric said involved in the process. having said that, the media interspearing iinterfering in oe biggest scandals in ten years is awful. it had to have. by the way, we're armchair quarterbacking. that's what we do here. >> bob: i understand that. you have to look at the largeer picture here. if the republicans not to recognize a problem, and look at it as sandy and the rest of it is disservice to themselve themselves. >> kimberly: it's just not that simplistic. factors, we said he had an excellent get out the vote. even knows that. this is a campaign, they had excellent strategy. they played well. they knew what it took to win. that is it. what do you want me to say? bottom line. >> bob: republicans had no strategy to attract -- o
serious stuff. iran is firing on a u.s. drone. just the latest foreign policy skirmish for the white house to deal with. what other challenges will the president need to address overseas in the next four years? might be with a new secretary of state. who should have the reins of the department of defense, the cia? that and more with four-star general jack keane. he will give his insight straight ahead. is what drives us to broadcast the world's biggest events in 3d, or live to your seat high above the atlantic ocean. it's what drives us to create eco-friendly race tracks, batteries that power tomorrow's cars, nearlyndestructible laptops, and the sustainable smart towns of the future. at panasonic, we're driven to make what matters most better. just another way we're engineering a better world for you. jamie: well new next hour, thousands of people still without power after superstorm sandy. what needs to be done to prevent widespread outages when that next storm hits? >>> united airlines flight crew calls for help in route to washington, d.c. military jets had to escort the plane to safety
-line foreign policy issues including syria and iran, but also some of the others like foreign aid which has a nice rubber ducky on your catalogs that you're looking at today. >> and we appreciate that. it helps pay our salaries. [laughter] i think bob corker's going to be pretty interesting as the ranking member on foreign relations. he spent the -- he skipped the republican convention the this summer to go to the middle east, you know? and he's been doing a lot of traveling. he's super smart about these kinds of things. and i think that he will try to mold himself a little bit -- not completely -- like dick lieu bar, honestly. -- lugar, honestly. and he'll be against the hawk as, i think, on a number of occasions. he did a story recently about him, and we had john mccain talking about how much he respected him even though they don't always see eye to eye. but i will say this, i think that, um, the foreign relations panels in both chambers, um, you know, since i guess the '60s really have just not had as much of an impact on what the president does as they, as they used to. um, now, if kerr
in the christian conservative community. it does seem, to me, to have evolved. can you talk about foreign policy or gay individuals and how the christian community is now or conservative christian community is looking at those issues? >> yeah. i mean, we're still looking at the postelection survey that we, um, commissioned, that we got very early this morning, about 5 a.m. but the preliminary evidence is pretty consistent with what i've seen throughout my career, you know? there's a tendency to sort of caricature and stigmatize voters of devout faith and sort of suggest that they live in trailer parks, and they're poor, not educated and easy to command, and they cling to their guns and their religion, and they vote on gay marriage and abortion. not true. if you look at the evangelicals who voted yesterday, they voted on the economy and jobs by the exact same percentage that the entire electorate did. to put it in biblical terms, it rains on the righteous and the unrighteous alike. so evangelicals and faithful catholics are underwater on their mortgages. they're also struggling. they're trying to
" had an article calling obama's other fiscal cliff foreign policy. one of the biggest shakeups is on the three of the chair and ranking members being gone. if senator kerry moved positions that would be a clean slate. i am wondering how you think that might affect the president's ability to deal with the top issues, including syria and iran and maybe some of the others that has a nice rubber ducky on your catalog that you are looking at today. >> we appreciate that. it helps to pay our salary. i think bob corker will be interesting as the ranking member on foreign relations. hehe skipped the republican convention this summer to go to the middle east. and he has been doing a lot of traveling. he is super smart about these kinds of things. i think he will try to mold himself a little bit -- not completely, like dick lugar, honestly. he will be against the hawks i think on a number of occasions. we did a story recently about him and we had john mccain talk about how much -- how much he respected and although they did not always see eye to eye. but i think the foreign relations pa
but it is already having an adverse impact on our foreign policy relations with mexico. host: what are your thoughts? guest: the court said the federal government is able to enforce their laws. the accord said nothing about preemption. -- the court said nothing about preemption. they can force federal law throughout the united states of america. colorado and washington and moved their state laws. federal law enforcement can go into washington and colorado and force marijuana prohibition. does the dea and department of justice wants to spend federal tax dollars acting in compliance -- to arrest individuals acting in compliance with state laws? that tax dollars would be going to enforcement all laws that are now on popular by a majority of americans. against people who are acting legally under state law. host: let's get our viewers and listeners in vaults and the numbers are on the screen -- our first call comes from debra in richmond, va., on our line for democrats. caller: good morning, i would like to know the procedures that i would have to take in a state that has legalized a medical marijuana. i
on some of the foreign-policy stuffy has espoused and may disagree with him on that, and that's fine, but he engages you in a debate of ideas around some really strong principles, like the constitution. ron paul will estimate bridget still be a strong player. his son will be a very important voice in the next year or so. i get it. my style is not necessarily the warmest for some conservatives who like the it straight laced stand in the background. i thought of the chairmanship needed to be a vibrant part of the political process. that meant putting it out on the street. that meant doing some shows that were not necessarily traditional for the rnc chairman to do. i just felt very strongly, and i still do, that the power does not rest down here but arrests out in america in the streets. you saw this happen again in this election. it was all race centralized back in washington because we will tell you how to do it because we know best. the reason they hired me was to come in and break that up. some did not like that, whoever else down in other parts of the country and that's fine. the g
. followed by prime minister david cameron's spetch on foreign policy at the annual lord mayor 's man quet. this will be the third time speaking before the banquet since becoming prime minister in 2010. join us for his remarks at 3:30 p.m. eastern. and then later at georgetown university, musician and activist bono talks about social enterprise and social movements like his project red campaign. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern. now a discussion about the results of the 2012 election with media research president brent bozell, coordinator for the tea party patriots and president of the susan b. anthony list. from the press club, this is about 40 minutes. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is richard vigory, chairman of the conservative.q.com. i will speak for a few minutes and introduce five nationally known, recognized conservative leaders. and we will each talk for a little bit and then we will open it for q & a. battle to take over the republican party begins today. and the failed republican leadership should resign. out of last night's disaster comes good news, ho
republican strategy? they are social, economic, and foreign policy, fully embracing each one. what we had was one wobbly leg with about $1 billion from the republican side from the top of the ticket and affecting every other senate race in the country because of that influence. when fully engaged, each of those policy areas, a real mandate is created, and there is a resonance that brings public policy leaders into office so those areas can be implemented, without fully engaging on each of those areas and social policy, we leave the votes on the table every single time. what we had was a factor truth on social issues on one side but a full embrace of the war on social issues on the other side. obama have launched a war over abortion and the life issue. therefore, he got to completely decide what the issue was, and what is it? rape. abortion and rape in the minds of many voters, because the debate was not fully engage. his weaknesses, is extreme positions on late storm abortions -- late term abortions, i'm not saving children born after a failed of abortion, none of these were explored in a
administrations to share information with those of us that are supposed to make critical foreign policy decisions and the budget process. very unwilling, and certainly this is another case of the. but i was struck as well that, you need to tell me the head of the cia uses gmail? [inaudible] >> to communicate? it just struck me that i'm very concerned about the. and, obviously, there will be some areas into this but i see this coming, and apparently he has agreed to testify, as he should, like everybody involved should be testifying in his and provide as much openness as possible. i look forward to the committee taking a lead on that. [inaudible] >> some of your colleagues on ssi, senate republicans are time of making a deal with with democrats to find a compromise. first of all, what do you make of those efforts? second, how far are you willing to go to to strike an immigration deal with democrats? >> well, that is a good question and i wouldn't have been surprised if i didn't hear it. i think that, i seen a bit of a pattern over the years of people coming into this congress and taking a look at
your head on some of the foreign-policy stuffy has espoused and may disagree with him on that, and that's fine, but he engages you in a debate of ideas around some really strong principles, like the constitution. ron paul will estimate bridget still be a strong player. his son will be a very important voice in the next year or so. i get it. my style is not necessarily the warmest for some conservatives who like the it straight laced stand in the background. i thought of the chairmanship needed to be a vibrant part of the political process. that meant putting it out on the street. that meant doing some shows that were not necessarily traditional for the rnc chairman to do. i just felt very strongly, and i still do, that the power does not rest down here but arrests out in america in the streets. you saw this happen again in this election. it was all race centralized back in washington because we will tell you how to do it because we know best. the reason they hired me was to come in and break that up. some did not like that, whoever else down in other parts of the country and that's fine
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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